Monthly Archives: September 2013

23rd August 2013


What an amazing week cruising in France !! You each have a genuine warmth and friendliness that is evidence from the very first meeting. Jason and I felt like you were old friends and that you were simply introducing us to your other friends, who just happen to be amazing wine makers, lock keepers, artists and world famous Balloonists! Thank you for sharing your gifts and talents with us. Caroline – none of our clothes fit (seriously) You have inspired us to go home and bring a little of France to the States… but how can we ever hope to replicate your magic; Thanks for the best meals ever – you are a magician. Rory – your skill is unbelievable on the canals – we are in awe of how you gentle guide 120 feet of barge into such a narrow lock. It is lovely to see your gracious spirit as you greet everyone. Hannah, you are the glue that makes it all seem seamless … or else there is a fairy who keeps everything sparkling and magically appears to fulfil any wish. And Nick – the best guide and teacher. We have thoroughly enjoyed your humorous and insightful lessons on everything from French history to Burgundian wines to what really makes the English the English ! We will miss you !!


Kelli and Jason

Posted on: 09 Sep 2013
Posted by: Rory & Caroline Mcrae

A fine, warm summer has been beneficial to the grapes and they are now ripening well. We estimate the harvest to start in the week of the 23rd of September. Many people wonder why the Burgundy wines manage to be so complex and so different each one from the other in spite of the fact that we only really use 2 grapes. The whites are made from the Chardonnay grape, and the reds from Pinot noir. These 2 grapes only, provide over 1,400 different wines in an area that is 15 times smaller than Bordeaux! So how do we manage this amazing feat of diversity? The first part of the quality of our wines comes from geology.


Our wine slopes were formed tens of millions of years ago, and came about because of a series of geological ‘accidents’. The slopes were formed and a series of earthquakes changed the land, which had formerly been a homogenous layer, into a variety of soil types and compositions varying from place to place, and often only a few metres apart. The vines, which have long roots, now traverse those different soil types on their way down looking for food and water, and then transport the different influences up into the plant, and later, into the glass. Pinot noir and Chardonnay then work for us as humble messengers of the terroir. The word ‘Terroir’ is a unique and all encompassing word that covers all aspects of the influences on our wines; but that will be for the next installment! …..


Miss Pinot Noir

Posted on: 09 Sep 2013
Posted by: Rory & Caroline Mcrae